The Essential Guide to Construction Law in Australia

Updated on 2 December 2023, by Rachelle Hare, Specialist Construction Lawyer, Blaze Business & Legal

About Construction Law

Construction Law is a complex branch of law that deals with legal issues related to the Construction Industry. It involves various aspects of construction such as building and engineering, infrastructure, property development, carrying out projects, construction contracts, environmental laws, work health and safety regulations, employment and fair work, insurance and liability and dispute resolution. Construction Lawyers must have broad knowledge across all these areas to provide the best advice to their clients.  


Construction Law in Australia is governed by various legal frameworks, including:

  1. the National Construction Code (NCC) (previously referred to as the Building Code of Australia - Australia’s primary set of technical design and construction provisions for buildings);
  2. the Security of Payment Acts (for each State or Territory);
  3. the Home Building Acts or equivalent (for each State or Territory); and 
  4. the Work Health and Safety Act (WHS Act). 

These legal frameworks outline the minimum requirements for the design and construction of new buildings, emphasise the health, safety, amenity, and sustainable design of buildings, regulate the construction of residential construction, and govern payment of contractors and subcontractors on construction projects.


Each State and Territory of Australia has different laws and regulations relating to the Construction Industry, however they are generally similar.


It is the role of the Construction Lawyer to understand the differences between laws in different jurisdictions so businesses can practice in various parts of Australia.

Image of a map of Australia with a silouhette of a construction project. Caption reads, "Construction Law in Australia." Blaze Business & Legal Logo

Lawyers who specialise in Construction Law are referred to as "Construction Lawyers", and they are commonly divided into two categories:

  1. front-end Construction Lawyers (who advise on contracts and projects, all the way to the formal dispute stage); and 
  2. back-end Construction Lawyers (who advise on dispute resolution and legal claims). 

Key Takeaways

  • Construction law is a complex area of law that deals with legal issues related to the construction industry, including building and engineering, property development, risk, environmental laws, work health and safety regulations, employment and fair work, insurance and liability and dispute resolution.
  • Construction law in Australia is governed by various legal frameworks, including the National Construction Code (NCC), the various Security of Payment Acts, and the WHS Act.
  • The legal frameworks outline minimum requirements for design, construction, residential buildings, health and safety, payment, and various other issues, and Construction Lawyers must have a broad knowledge across all of these areas to be able to advise you properly.

Rachelle Hare from Blaze Business & Legal is a specialist Contract Lawyer with over 23 years of experience in planning, drafting, reviewing, negotiating, and managing contracts, as well as resolving disputes. She has worked in the In-House Teams of Thiess, Laing O'Rourke, Airservices, DHA, Golding Contractors and Acciona. She has also advised hundreds of clients across industries including Construction, Civil, Government, Infrastructure, Mining, Energy, Renewable Energy, Water and Wastewater, Transport, Agriculture, Education, Health, and many more.


Rachelle owns her own businesses, and because she is also a Business Adviser and Management Consultant, she is able to advise on operational, commercial, procurement, financial, sales, marketing, contractual and many other issues as well as legal.

Overview of Construction Law in Australia

Construction law in Australia is a complex and constantly evolving area of law that regulates the design, construction, and maintenance of buildings and other structures. The law is designed to ensure that buildings are safe, sustainable, and fit for purpose, and to protect the interests of all parties involved in the construction process.


In Australia, construction law is primarily governed by State and Territory legislation, including the Building Code of Australia (BCA) and the National Construction Code (NCC). These codes set out the minimum standards for the design and construction of buildings, including requirements for structural integrity, fire safety, and energy efficiency.

Construction Law, Image of a Construction Site Development

Lawyers who specialise in construction law are well-versed in the relevant legislation and regulations, and can provide expert advice to clients involved in construction disputes. They may also assist clients with drafting and negotiating contracts, and with obtaining the necessary permits and approvals for construction projects.


The construction industry in Australia is a major contributor to the economy, and is responsible for the construction of a wide range of buildings and infrastructure projects, including residential homes, commercial buildings, roads, bridges, and tunnels. In order for any of these projects to take place, a contract is required to govern how the project will operate. Construction law plays a vital role in ensuring that these projects are completed safely, on time, and within budget, that the terms of the contract are understood and are followed, and that any disputes are promptly resolved.


Construction law in Australia is a complex and important area of law that regulates the construction industry and protects the interests of all parties involved in the construction process. With the help of knowledgeable and experienced lawyers, clients can navigate the complex legal landscape and ensure that their construction projects are completed successfully.


Legal Framework in Construction

Construction law in Australia is a complex and specialised area that requires a full cradle to grave legal service to a vast array of clients including institutional investors, project companies, government entitites, local government, sponsors, developers, contractors, regulators and financiers. The legal framework governing construction law includes common law, statutory and industry-based regulations. 


The legal issues arising in contract administration and contract management, including tendering and contract preparation, are also part of the legal framework. Professional liability, including that of superintendents, is another crucial aspect of the legal framework.


The legal framework also includes the choice of contracting methodology for project delivery. The contracting methodology can be design and construct, construct-only, managing contractor, cost-plus, or many others, and the project delivery method selected will affect the allocation of responsibility. The legal framework also involves the allocation of risk and responsibility, which must be carried out by expert Construction Lawyers in order to give each project the best chance of success.


Overall, the legal framework of construction law is a broad and specialised area that requires a full cradle to grave legal service to a vast array of clients. It involves multiple areas of practice, including advice, planning, contracts, project advisory, and dispute resolution.


The choice of contracting methodology for project delivery and the allocation of risk and responsibility are crucial aspects of the legal framework.


Construction Law Across Australian States

Construction law in Australia is regulated by each state and territory, which means that the rules and regulations can vary from one jurisdiction to another. Here is an overview of construction law across some of the Australian states:


New South Wales

In New South Wales, the construction industry is regulated by the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment. The key legislation governing the sector is the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (EP&A Act) and the Building and Construction Industry Security of Payment Act 1999 (SOP Act). The EP&A Act sets out the framework for the assessment and approval of development applications, while the SOP Act provides a mechanism for contractors and subcontractors to recover payment for construction work.


Victoria

In Victoria, the construction industry is regulated by the Victorian Building Authority (VBA). The VBA is responsible for overseeing the registration and regulation of building practitioners, as well as enforcing compliance with building regulations and standards. The key legislation governing the sector is the Building Act 1993 and the Building Regulations 2018.


Western Australia

In Western Australia, the construction industry is regulated by the Building and Energy Division of the Department of Mines, Industry Regulation and Safety. The key legislation governing the sector is the Building Act 2011 and the Building Services (Registration) Act 2011. The Building Act sets out the framework for the regulation of building standards and requirements, while the Building Services (Registration) Act provides for the registration of building service providers.


South Australia

In South Australia, the construction industry is regulated by the Department of Planning, Transport and Infrastructure. The key legislation governing the sector is the Development Act 1993 and the Development Regulations 2008. The Development Act sets out the framework for the assessment and approval of development applications, while the Development Regulations prescribe the technical requirements for building work.


Overall, construction law in Australia is complex and can be subject to change. It is important for those involved in the construction industry to stay up-to-date with the latest regulations and requirements in their respective state or territory.


Work Health and Safety Regulations

The Work Health and Safety Regulations 2011 is a set of regulations made under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011. These regulations provide detailed information on how to comply with the Act and are an essential part of the work health and safety (WHS) system in Australia.


The regulations cover a range of topics related to WHS, including definitions, duties of persons conducting a business or undertaking (PCBUs), health and safety representatives, risk management, and more. It is important for all PCBUs, including contractors and engineers, to understand and comply with these regulations to ensure a safe and healthy workplace.


One of the key aspects of the regulations is the requirement for PCBUs to manage risks to health and safety in the workplace. This includes identifying hazards, assessing risks, and implementing control measures to eliminate or minimise those risks. PCBUs must also consult with workers and their representatives on health and safety matters, and provide training and instruction to workers to ensure they can work safely.


Another important aspect of the regulations is the requirement for PCBUs to have a safety management system (SMS) in place. An SMS is a systematic approach to managing WHS that includes policies, procedures, and processes to identify, assess, and control risks. The regulations provide guidance on what should be included in an SMS and how it should be implemented.


The regulations also set out the duties of health and safety representatives (HSRs), who are elected by workers to represent their health and safety interests in the workplace. HSRs have a range of powers and functions, including the right to inspect the workplace, issue provisional improvement notices, and direct unsafe work to stop.


The Work Health and Safety Regulations 2011 are an essential part of the WHS system in Australia. PCBUs, contractors, and engineers must understand and comply with these regulations to ensure a safe and healthy workplace. The regulations cover a range of topics related to WHS, including risk management, safety management systems, and the duties of health and safety representatives.


Employment and Fair Work in Construction

Construction is a significant industry in Australia and employs a large number of workers. As such, it is important that employers and employees in the construction industry are aware of their rights and obligations under the Fair Work Act and other relevant employment laws.


The Fair Work Act 2009 is the primary legislation governing employment in Australia. It sets out the minimum standards for employment, including pay rates, leave entitlements, and termination of employment. Employers in the construction industry must comply with the Fair Work Act and any relevant industry awards or agreements.


Employees in the construction industry are entitled to the same rights and protections as employees in any other industry. This includes protection against discrimination, harassment, and unfair dismissal. If an employee feels that their rights have been breached, they can seek legal advice and take action through the Fair Work Commission.


Employers in the construction industry must also ensure that they provide a safe working environment for their employees. This includes complying with relevant health and safety laws and regulations, providing appropriate training and equipment, and implementing appropriate risk management strategies.


It is important for employers and employees in the construction industry to be aware of their rights and obligations under the law. This can help to prevent disputes and ensure that everyone is treated fairly and with respect. Legal advice can be sought if necessary to ensure compliance with the law and to resolve any disputes that may arise.


Environmental Laws and Construction

Construction activities have a significant impact on the environment. Therefore, it is essential to comply with the environmental laws and regulations when undertaking construction projects. These laws and regulations aim to minimise the environmental risks associated with land development and construction activities.


The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 is the primary environmental legislation in Australia. It provides a framework for protecting the environment and conserving biodiversity. The Act requires individuals and organisations to obtain permits before undertaking activities that may have a significant impact on the environment. Construction activities such as land clearing, excavation, and building may require permits under this Act.


In addition to the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, there are also state and territory-level environmental laws and regulations that apply to construction activities. For example, in Victoria, the Environment Protection Act 2017 requires construction activities to comply with the state's environmental regulations. The Act aims to prevent harm to human health and the environment from pollution and waste.


Renovations are also subject to environmental laws and regulations. For example, if a renovation involves the removal of asbestos-containing materials, it must be carried out by a licensed asbestos removalist. Asbestos is a hazardous material that can cause serious health problems when inhaled.


To ensure compliance with environmental laws and regulations, it is essential to obtain the necessary permits and approvals before commencing construction activities. Failure to comply with these laws can result in significant fines and penalties.


Construction activities have a significant impact on the environment, and it is essential to comply with environmental laws and regulations when undertaking construction projects. Obtaining the necessary permits and approvals and complying with environmental regulations can help minimise the environmental risks associated with construction activities.


Property and Infrastructure Development

Construction law encompasses matters related to the design, construction, operation, or maintenance of buildings, infrastructure, and other assets. Property and infrastructure development is an essential aspect of construction law, as it involves the creation of new structures and the renovation of existing ones.


Property development involves the construction of new residential and commercial buildings, while infrastructure development involves the creation of essential public services, such as roads, bridges, and utilities. Both types of development require careful planning and execution to ensure that they meet the needs of the community while adhering to zoning and other legal requirements.


Zoning regulations play a vital role in property and infrastructure development. Zoning laws dictate how land can be used, what types of structures can be built, and where they can be located. These regulations help ensure that new development is compatible with the existing community and that it does not negatively impact the environment or public health.


Residential and commercial property development requires compliance with various legal requirements, including building codes, environmental regulations, and local bylaws. Developers must obtain the necessary permits and approvals before construction can begin. They must also ensure that their projects are completed on time and within budget while meeting the required quality standards.


Infrastructure projects, such as highways, bridges, and airports, require significant investment and careful planning. These projects often involve collaboration between various government agencies, private companies, and contractors. Infrastructure development must adhere to strict safety standards and environmental regulations to protect the public and the environment.


Property and infrastructure development is a critical aspect of construction law. Developers must comply with zoning regulations, obtain necessary permits and approvals, and adhere to strict safety and environmental standards. Successful property and infrastructure development requires careful planning, collaboration, and adherence to legal requirements.


Keep in mind that some Law Firms specialise in Property Law and Construction Law, so you may need to speak with both types of specialists to address zoning and permit issues as well as construction law issues.


Building and Engineering Aspects

Construction law in Australia regulates various aspects of building and engineering projects. Builders are responsible for the construction of buildings and structures, while engineers are responsible for designing and planning these structures. Specialised contractors are also involved in the construction process, providing specific services such as plumbing, electrical, and mechanical work.


Builders are required to comply with the National Construction Code (NCC), which outlines the minimum requirements for the design and construction of new buildings as well as various Australian Standards. The NCC (previously called the Building Code of Australia) lays particular emphasis on the health, safety, amenity, and sustainable design of buildings. Builders must also consider factors such as structural integrity, safety, environmental impact.


Builders must also comply with relevant state and territory legislation, such as the Home Building Act 1989 (NSW) and the Domestic Building Contracts Act 1995 (Vic).


Specialised contractors play a critical role in the construction process, providing specific services that are essential to the completion of building and engineering projects. These contractors must comply with relevant legislation and regulations, including occupational health and safety laws and environmental protection laws.


In addition to complying with relevant legislation and regulations, builders, engineers, and specialised contractors must also ensure that they meet contractual obligations. Construction contracts typically include provisions relating to the scope of work, timelines, payment, and dispute resolution. It is essential that all parties involved in a construction project have a clear understanding of their contractual obligations to avoid disputes and legal issues.


Overall, construction law in Australia covers a wide range of building and engineering aspects, from compliance with building codes and standards to contractual obligations and dispute resolution. Builders, engineers, and specialised contractors must have a thorough understanding of these legal requirements to ensure that their projects are completed successfully and in compliance with the law.


Role of Construction Lawyers

Construction lawyers play a crucial role in the construction industry, providing legal guidance and advice to various entities involved in construction projects. Their primary responsibility is to ensure that all legal and contractual aspects of a construction project are in compliance with relevant legal principles and policies.


Construction lawyers work with a range of stakeholders, including property developers, contractors, subcontractors, engineers, architects, and government agencies. They assist in drafting, reviewing, and negotiating construction contracts, advising on various legal issues, and resolving disputes that may arise during the project.


One of the key roles of a construction lawyer is to ensure that all parties involved in the construction project are aware of their legal obligations and responsibilities. They provide legal advice and assistance in interpreting the terms and conditions of the construction contract, ensuring that all parties are aware of their rights and obligations.


Construction lawyers also play a crucial role in managing and resolving disputes that may arise during the construction project. They assist in the negotiation and settlement of disputes, including claims for additional payment, delays, and defects. They also represent clients in legal proceedings, including litigation and arbitration.


In addition to their legal expertise, construction lawyers must also have a good understanding of the construction industry and its practices. They must be familiar with construction processes, materials, and technologies, as well as the relevant laws and regulations governing the industry.


Construction lawyers play a critical role in ensuring that construction projects are completed on time, within budget, and in compliance with legal principles and policies. Their expertise and knowledge are essential in managing the legal aspects of construction projects and ensuring that all parties are aware of their rights and obligations.


Construction Contracts

Construction contracts are legal agreements between the parties involved in a construction project. They outline the terms and conditions of the project, including the scope of work, cost, time, quality-related matters, and specifications. A well-drafted construction contract is essential to provide certainty for both parties in relation to a construction project.


Construction contracts are governed by both construction law and contract law. Construction law is a specialised area of law that deals with legal issues related to construction projects. Contract law, on the other hand, governs the legal relationship between parties involved in a construction project. It sets out the rights and responsibilities of each party, including payment terms, project timelines, and dispute resolution mechanisms.


There are several types of construction contracts, including:

  • Lump sum contracts: In this type of contract, the contractor agrees to complete the project for a fixed price.
  • Cost-plus contracts: In this type of contract, the contractor is reimbursed for the actual cost of the project plus a fee.
  • Time and material contracts: In this type of contract, the contractor is paid based on the time and materials used to complete the project.
  • Unit price contracts: In this type of contract, the contractor is paid based on the number of units of work completed.

Construction contracts can be complex and can involve many parties, including the owner, contractor, subcontractors, suppliers, and consultants. It is essential to ensure that all parties understand the terms and conditions of the contract and their respective obligations and responsibilities.


Construction contracts provide certainty for both parties and help to manage the risks associated with a construction project. It is essential to seek legal advice when drafting or negotiating a construction contract to ensure that it is legally enforceable and protects the interests of all parties involved.


Insurance and Liability in Construction

Construction projects are inherently risky, and things can go wrong at any stage of the project. Insurance is one way to manage these risks (or more correctly, to transfer the risk). Construction insurance policies can provide coverage for property damage, bodily injury, and other losses that may occur during the construction process.


Read our article about risk management and risk transfer


Builders and contractors in Australia are required to have certain types of insurance coverage. For example, they must have public liability insurance to cover them for any damage or injury they may cause to third parties during the construction process. They may also need to have contract works insurance, which provides coverage for damage to the worksite, materials, and equipment.


In addition to insurance, builders and contractors must also be aware of their liability for defects in construction work. Under the Building Code of Australia, builders are required to provide a warranty period for their work. This period is typically six years for structural defects and two years for non-structural defects. During this period, builders are responsible for fixing any defects that arise.


Councils also have a role to play in managing risk in construction projects. They are responsible for enforcing building codes and standards, and they may require builders to obtain certain permits and approvals before beginning work. Councils may also conduct inspections of construction sites to ensure that work is being done in accordance with the building code and other regulations.


It is important for builders and contractors to understand their insurance and liability obligations in construction projects. They should work closely with their insurance providers and legal advisors to ensure that they have the appropriate coverage and are complying with all relevant regulations.


By managing risk effectively, builders and contractors can help to ensure the success of their projects and protect themselves from potential financial losses.


Orange excavator in a storm, representing an extension of time. Blaze Business & Legal.

Time, Cost and Quality in Construction

Time, cost and quality are three critical factors in construction projects. They are often referred to as the "golden triangle" of construction, and the success of a project depends on how well these three factors are managed.


Time

Time is an essential factor in construction projects. It refers to the duration of the project, from the start to the completion of the construction work.


In most construction contracts, the Contractor is required to bring the Works to Practical Completion by the Date for Practical Completion. If an event outside the Contractor's control delays the Works, the Contractor may be entitled to an Extension of Time. The wording of the Contract will govern whether or not the Contractor is allowed to claim, and there may be time bars and other preventions on claiming that the Contractor needs to be careful of. Read our detailed article here on Understanding Extension of Time (EOT) Claims.


Time management is crucial in construction projects as it ensures that the project is completed within the specified timeframe. Delay in construction projects can be costly and can result in disputes between the parties involved.


One of the common ways to manage time in construction projects is to use a construction schedule. A construction schedule is a plan that outlines the sequence of activities to be performed, the duration of each activity, and the resources required for each activity. The schedule helps to ensure that the project is completed on time.


Cost

Cost is another essential factor in construction projects. It refers to the amount of money required to complete the project. Cost management is critical in construction projects as it ensures that the project is completed within the budget.


One of the common ways to manage cost in construction projects is to prepare a budget. A budget is a financial plan that outlines the estimated cost of the project. The budget helps to ensure that the project is completed within the estimated cost.


Quality

Quality is the third factor in the "golden triangle" of construction. It refers to the level of excellence or superiority of the construction work. Quality management is essential in construction projects as it ensures that the construction work meets the required standards.


One of the common ways to manage quality in construction projects is to prepare a quality plan. A quality plan is a document that outlines the quality objectives, the quality standards, and the quality control measures to be implemented. The quality plan helps to ensure that the construction work meets the required quality standards.


Time, Cost and Quality

Time, cost and quality are interrelated, and the management of one factor can affect the other two factors. For example, if the project is completed within the specified timeframe, it may result in increased cost due to the use of additional resources. Similarly, if the quality of the construction work is not up to the required standards, it may result in delays and increased cost.


Therefore, it is essential to manage time, cost and quality effectively in construction projects to ensure the success of the project. The management of these factors requires careful planning, monitoring, and control throughout the project's lifecycle.


Other Common Construction Concepts

In addition to the legal concepts discussed earlier, there are several other common concepts that are important to understand in the field of construction law.


Variations

Variations refer to any changes that are made to the original scope of work in a construction contract. These changes can be initiated by either the contractor or the client and can include additions, deletions, or modifications to the original work. It is important to have a clear process for managing variations in a construction contract to avoid disputes and ensure that the project is completed on time and within budget.


Delay and Disruption

Delays and disruptions are common in construction projects and can be caused by a variety of factors, including weather, labour shortages, material shortages, and design changes. It is important to have a clear understanding of the causes of delays and disruptions and to have a process in place for managing them. This may include provisions in the contract for extensions of time and compensation for additional costs incurred as a result of the delay or disruption.


Defects and Liability

Defects in construction work can arise from a variety of factors, including poor workmanship, faulty design, and the use of defective materials. In some cases, defects can cause damage to property or even personal injury. It is important to have a clear understanding of the liability for defects in a construction contract and to have a process in place for identifying and rectifying defects.


Payment and Security

Payment is a critical aspect of any construction project, and it is important to have a clear process for managing payment and ensuring that all parties are paid in a timely manner. This may include provisions in the contract for progress payments, retention money, and security for payment. It is also important to have a clear understanding of the security for payment legislation in the relevant jurisdiction.


Quality and Standards

Quality and standards are important considerations in any construction project, and it is important to have a clear understanding of the relevant standards and regulations. This may include compliance with building codes, safety standards, and environmental regulations. It is also important to have a process in place for ensuring that the work meets the required quality standards and that any defects are identified and rectified in a timely manner.


Conclusion

Construction Law is a complex area of law that is essential to the construction industry. It encompasses a wide range of legal issues that arise during the course of a construction project, from pre-planning environmental clearances and building plan approvals, to final local council permits for noise restrictions.


Through the study of Construction Law, students gain an understanding of the regulatory regime for construction contracting, causes of action in construction disputes, and the legal aspects of project procurement. They also develop skills in contract preparation, writing legal hypotheticals, and construction law research tools and techniques.


Overall, the study of Construction Law is crucial for anyone involved in the construction industry, including architects, engineers, contractors, and developers. It provides a solid foundation of legal knowledge that is necessary for navigating the complex legal landscape of construction projects.


While it is impossible to predict all of the legal issues that may arise during a construction project, a solid understanding of Construction Law can help to mitigate risk and ensure that projects are completed on time and within budget.


As the construction industry continues to grow, the importance of Construction Law will only continue to increase.

FAQs

1. What are the key principles of Construction Law in Australia?

Construction Law in Australia is governed by both State and Commonwealth legislation, as well as common law principles. Construction Law regulates the relationships between parties involved in construction projects, including Principals, Contractors, Subcontractors, Suppliers, and Consultants. It also covers issues such as workplace health and safety, environmental regulations, and building codes and standards.


2. What are the different types of construction contracts commonly used in Australia?

The most common types of construction contracts used in Australia include Lump Sum Contracts, Cost Plus Contracts, and Design and Construct Contracts. Lump Sum Contracts involve a fixed price for the entire project, while Cost Plus Contracts involve the Principal paying the Contractor for the actual cost of the work plus a fee based on overheads and margin. Design and Construct Contracts involve the Contractor being responsible for both the design and construction of the project.


3. What are the qualifications and experience required to practice Construction Law in Australia?

To practice construction law in Australia, a lawyer must hold a valid practicing certificate from the relevant state or territory law society. They must also have a thorough understanding of construction law principles and relevant legislation. Many construction lawyers have a background in engineering, architecture, or construction management, as well as legal qualifications.


4. What are the legal obligations of builders, contractors and subcontractors in relation to workplace health and safety?

Builders, contractors, and subcontractors have a legal obligation to ensure the health and safety of workers on construction sites. This includes complying with relevant workplace health and safety legislation (also referred to as occupational health and safety legislation), providing appropriate training and supervision, and implementing safe work practices. Failure to comply with these obligations can result in fines, legal action, and even imprisonment.


5. What are some of the recent changes to Construction Laws in Australia and how do they impact the industry?

Recent changes to construction laws in Australia include the introduction of new building codes and regulations, changes to the Security of Payment Act, as well as changes to workplace health and safety legislation. These changes aim to improve safety standards, increase transparency, and promote better quality construction practices. They also place greater responsibility on builders, contractors, and subcontractors to comply with legal obligations.


6. What are some of the common disputes that arise in construction projects and how are they resolved?

Common disputes that arise in construction projects include disputes over payment, variations to the scope of work, defects and delays. These disputes can be resolved through negotiation, mediation, arbitration, or litigation. It is important for parties involved in construction projects to have a clear understanding of their legal rights and obligations, and to seek legal advice when disputes arise.

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About the Author

Rachelle Hare

Rachelle Hare

Rachelle Hare is a highly experienced Construction Lawyer and Contract Lawyer, with over 23 years of experience in Tier 1 and Tier 2 Construction Firms, Top Tier Private Practice and Government.

With 23+ years of experience as a Senior Lawyer, Strategic Contracting Adviser and Management Consultant in Construction Law, Contracts, Major Projects, Commercial Advisory, Compliance, Procurement, Contract Management and Risk Management, Rachelle has the rare skills to offer you seamless business advice and legal advice to help support your organisation.


As well as a Lawyer and Business Adviser, Rachelle has also acted as a Strategic Procurement Adviser, Compliance Manager, Strategic Risk Adviser and Commercial Manager.

Rachelle owns
Blaze Business & Legal, a combined Commercial Law Firm and Business Advisory Firm located in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Blaze Business & Legal assists a broad range of clients in the Construction Industry and related industries, and advises owners, contractors, subcontractors, NFPs and other organisations on a broad range of Construction Law, Commercial Law, Business Advisory and Management Consulting issues in Brisbane, Queensland and around Australia.

Rachelle also owns Blaze Professional Learning, where she offers practical contracting skills, hands-on experience in drafting and working with contracts, and industry insights to help Professionals upskill and advance their careers with real-world skills.

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